Stirling engine generator drives 8″ electric fan by Approtechie

Homemade Stirling engine generator

I love how affective these simple designs are. I’m always amazed with the performance of Approtecie’s Stirling engine generators.


This video shows the electric fan consuming 2.4 watts. From what I can see this engine is capable of doing some work. Which is better than most of the little science project models that are out there.

It’s obvious in the video that this little Stirling engine generator can produce more than enough power to run the 8″ fan. I like the part in the video where he removes the load and the engine immediately speeds up. It really show how much load just a little bit of magnetic resistance will do.

I’ve included links to Approtechie’s YouTube channel at the end of the post. His channel has this Stirling engine generator and many other great little inventions.

Quote from the Video Description:

I used two DC motors from an old inkjet printer, the larger one as the generator, the other as the fan motor, and measured the voltage and current while operating. The engine is putting out about 8 watts of shaft power in the video and the fan is consuming about 2.4 watts off the generator (9.25v x 0.26a).

This is not a great setup since the o-ring belt is not very efficient and the wires are too small, but it shows what can be done with a simple inexpensive Stirling engine. Of course, it could run lights, charge a battery, pump water, and lots of other stuff. The fan puts out quite a bit of air, you can hear the wind on the microphone at times.

I’ve run this engine for at least 100 hours now and no real problems yet.

More of Approtechie’s Videos

Stirling engine generator by ApprotechieYou can find more of Approtechie’s videos including his Stirling engine generator at the Technology for Development YouTube Channel. His ingenious engines and inventions are fun and interesting. His creations are build in

 
 
 
 

A search for inexpensive practical ways to help folks meet their own basic needs, especially in developing countries.

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